A Pound of Flesh: How Medical Copayments in Prison Cost Inmates Their Health and Set Them Up for Reoffense

“[T]hey had come to regard insolvency as the normal state of mankind, and the payment of debts as a disease that occasionally broke out.”[2] Brad seldom talks about the time he spent in prison.[3] Even while he was incarcerated, he generally steered our email and telephone conversations to topics in my life and the outside world—how my high school volleyball season was going, where I wanted to go to college, or how the Packers’ season was shaping up. Since being out of prison, my brother Continue reading →

When the Cat’s Away: Techlash, Loot Boxes, and Regulating “Dark Patterns” in the Video Game Industry’s Monetization Strategies

“There are some aspects of this business model that make it so—you’re not making games to be fun anymore. . . . [H]ere’s the stuff that addicts players, that makes people come back. You’re implementing these strategies to hook people, but they’re not necessarily having fun with your game anymore. They’re compelled to play because they need to increase their level or feel like they’re making some other kind of progression.”[2] PDF: Goodstein,[1] When the Cat’s Away Introduction “How do you sustain a business model in which users don’t Continue reading →

Let Cities Decide: End Colorado’s Prohibition on Rent Regulation

Dana Gilbert has lived in Denver, Colorado for twenty-eight years.[2] In addition to providing after-school childcare to her granddaughter, she works two jobs cleaning office buildings. Despite the fact that Dana can barely afford a studio apartment in Harvey Park[3]—the cheapest neighborhood on the outskirts of Denver—her landlord just sent a rent renewal lease for her apartment; rent is increasing from $800 to $1,050 per month for next year. This 31 percent increase puts the unit out of Dana’s price range. She secures a housing Continue reading →