“Make the Map All White”: The Meaning of Maps in the Prohibition and Suffrage Campaigns

Maps have long been deployed as instruments of power, protest, and reform in American history. In the antebellum era, Northerners used maps to galvanize opposition to the expansion of slavery beyond the South. These dramatic and urgent anti-slavery maps served as powerful models for two of the most ambitious challenges to American law in the twentieth century: prohibition and woman’s suffrage. Both movements began with regional strengths—suffrage in the West, prohibition in the South. Suffragists and prohibitionists widely circulated maps to highlight those legislative achievements Continue reading →

Organizing a Business Law Department Within a Law School

This article argues that legal education needs to get its act together by getting organized. Unlike the rest of the university, law schools are over a century behind in recognizing the need for the greater organization that departments can provide. Specialization, which did not exist many years ago, has become so universal that some members of any faculty either cannot understand or care about, much less govern wisely, what goes on around them. Ignorance is compounded by non-professional agendas driven by ideologies and interdisciplinary interests. Continue reading →

Bucklew v. Precythe and the Resurgence of the Method of Execution Challenge

On October 1, 2019, Missouri began the execution of death row inmate Russell Bucklew.[1] Those present for the execution reported seeing Mr. Bucklew strapped to a gurney, the IV inserted, and a white sheet up to his chest.[2] The elevated gurney was the only sign that Missouri had attempted to accommodate his cavernous hemangioma, a rare condition resulting in the growth of blood-filled tumors in his head, neck, and throat.[3] His face, notable for the sizeable blackish-purple tumor protruding from his upper lip, was turned Continue reading →

Access to Justice for Immigrants: A Lecture Presented in Memory of Breanna Boss

Ingrid Eagly,[1] Address to Colorado Law School on Monday, February 22, 2021 at 5:00-6:30 p.m.   The topic of today’s lecture, which was selected in Breanna Boss’s memory, is access to justice for immigrants. We gather here today at the start of a new presidential administration, but following four years that have significantly threatened access to justice for immigrants. Under President Donald Trump, a series of executive orders fundamentally restructured the immigration system and made all undocumented immigrants a priority for deportation.[2] Meanwhile, growing backlogs Continue reading →

Unclear and Unestablished: Exploring the Supreme Court/Tenth Circuit Disconnect in Qualified Immunity Jurisprudence

Since the founding, Americans have sought a perfectly calibrated government that vigorously protects, but never violates, citizens’ individual rights.[2] To accomplish this, government must balance orderly security and individual liberty. This liberty-or-security dilemma is significant to the study of the United States Constitution. Since at least the 1960s, the Supreme Court has repeatedly confronted this dilemma in the context of police use-of-force cases.[3] In these cases, the Supreme Court routinely grants summary judgment to police officers based on qualified immunity, thereby denying relief to aggrieved Continue reading →

Environmental Citizen Suits and the Inequities of Races to the Top

Environmental citizen suits were founded on the belief that empowering organizations and individuals to take legal action would provide a backstop against lax federal or state programs. Working in conjunction with the system of cooperative federalism, citizen suits were designed to uphold minimum levels of environmental protection and to provide a restraint on so called “races to the bottom” in which states compete for economic development by relaxing environmental standards. To our knowledge, no one has considered whether the geographic distribution of citizen suits could Continue reading →

Outsourced Emissions: Why Local Governments Should Track and Measure Consumption-Based Greenhouse Gases

While many local governments track greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions, almost all of them exclude most GHGs associated with consumption. These consumption-based emissions stem from the lifecycle production, pre-purchase transportation, sale, and disposal of goods, food, and services produced outside of a local jurisdiction but consumed inside the jurisdiction. Based on the limited data measuring extraterritorial emissions, these consumption-based emissions amount to more than half—and in some places more than three-fourths—of GHG emissions directly connected to local consumption patterns and behaviors. This Article argues that local Continue reading →

International Water Law and Fresh Water Dispute Resolution: A Cosean Perspective

International Water Law has developed a set of rules for resolving interstate fresh water disputes that govern both the substance of these disputes and the conduct of the disputing states. “Equitable and reasonable utilization” is commonly considered as the leading substantive rule, “no significant harm” as subsidiary to it, and the “duty to cooperate” as the central procedural rule. The purpose of this Article is to analyze the merits of these substantive and procedural rules under the lens of the celebrated Coase theorem. The “normative” Continue reading →

Communities of Interest in Colorado Redistricting

Every ten years, states redraw their congressional district boundaries following the results of the U.S. Census. This important process determines the boundaries of districts that will be represented in Congress. As a result, district boundaries selected through the redistricting process can directly impact future congressional elections and the subsequent representation of citizens’ concerns in Congress. If districts are drawn to favor one political party over another, certain sections of the population may see their political power diminished and thus be less fairly represented in Congress. Continue reading →

Expanding the Administrative Record: Using Pretext To Show “Bad Faith or Improper Behavior”

Within the first year of Donald Trump’s presidency, his Administration repealed, withdrew, or modified hundreds of regulations and agency decisions.[1] Although these rollbacks encompassed a wide array of administrative actions across a variety of regulatory fields,[2] the most significant and concentrated effort from the Trump Administration focused on destroying Obama-era environmental regulations.[3] President Trump himself promised to get “rid of [the Environmental Protection Agency] in every form,”[4] and his Administration attacked climate change policies by eliminating greenhouse gas (GHG) regulations that bound the nation’s biggest Continue reading →